The Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas is concerned with exploration and production of oil and natural gas, refining, distribution and marketing, import and export, and conservation of petroleum products.  The Ministry has been allocated Rs 42,901 crore for 2020-21.  The allocation for the ministry has remained unchanged from the allocation from the revised estimates for the year 2019-20.

Figure 1: Expenditure of Ministry (Rs Crore)

Note:  Figures for 2019-20 are Revised Estimates and for 2020-21 are Budget Estimates.

Sources:   Union Budget 2020-21; PRS.

The Ministry’s expenditure, historically, has been following the trend in global crude oil prices.  The crude oil prices have risen steadily from 28 USD/barrel in January 2016 to 80 USD/barrel in October 2018, before showing a volatile trend thereafter.  The global crude oil price was 66 USD/barrel in December 2019.

Figure 2: Trend of Global Crude Oil Price with respect to Petrol and Diesel Retail Price

Sources:   Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell; PRS.

Note that the price of petrol and diesel in India is higher compared to neighbouring nations, such as Pakistan, Sri Lanka and Nepal.  On the other hand, the price of Kerosene is lower in India, compared to these nations. 

Figure 3: Price of Petrol, Diesel and Kerosene with respect to neighbouring nations (Rs/litre)

Note:  Price as on November 1, 2019.  Petrol, Diesel price is the price at Delhi, whereas price for Kerosene is the price at Mumbai.   

Sources:  Oil Industry Information at a Glance, Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell, November 2019; PRS. 

Rise in crude oil prices usually also leads to rise in under-recoveries.  Under-recovery refers to the difference in the cost of producing petroleum products, and the price at which they are delivered to consumers.   It indicates the loss incurred by oil marketing companies while supplying these products.  Central government compensates the oil marketing companies by sharing some of this incurred loss through a burden sharing mechanism.  Figure 4 shows the trend of under-recoveries with the price of global crude oil.

Figure 4: Trend in under-recoveries of oil companies and global crude oil prices

Sources:  Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell; PRS.

Overview of finances

Table 1: Allocation for the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (in Rs Crore)

Major Head

Actual 18-19

Revised 19-20

Budgeted 20-21

% change (RE to BE)

LPG subsidy

20,268

34,086

37,256

9.3%

Kerosene subsidy

4,569

4,483

3,659

-18.4%

PDH pipeline

1,207

1,552

728

-53.1%

NSP

1,300

575

207

-64.0%

Others

5,027

2,206

1,051

-52.4%

Total

32,371

42,901

42,901

0.0%

Note:   NSP = National Seismic Programme.
Sources:  Union Budget Documents 2020-21; PRS.

LPG Subsidy:   The Ministry provides subsidy on LPG cylinders to beneficiaries.  Prior to 2013, this subsidy was provided in the form of subsidized cylinders.   Following the launch of the PAHAL scheme in 2013, this subsidy is directly credited to the bank accounts of the beneficiary. [1]  In 2020-21, the Ministry is estimated to spend Rs 37,256 crore on LPG subsidy, which is 9.3% higher than the revised estimates of 2019-20.

Kerosene Subsidy:   The Ministry provides subsidized kerosene through the Public Distribution System (PDS).  In 2020-21, the Ministry has allocated Rs 3,659 crore for Kerosene subsidy, which is 18.4% lower than the revised estimates of 2019-20.

PDH Pipeline:   The Phulpur-Dhamra-Haldia (PDH) Pipeline is being developed by GAIL India to transport natural gas. [2]   The project will connect five states to the National Gas Grid.  In 2020-21, Rs 728 crore has been allocated for the project.

National Seismic Programme:   The Ministry is conducting a seismic survey of all sedimentary basins of India, where such data is available.  The Programme was launched in October 2016 with an estimated expenditure of Rs 5,000 crore. [3]   The Programme has been allocated Rs 207 crore for 2020-21.  This is 64% lower than the revised estimates of 2019-20.

Figure 5: Composition of Ministry's budget

 

Sources:  Union Budget 2020-21; PRS.

Key issues and analysis

Subsidy on LPG and Kerosene

The subsidy on LPG is the largest component of the Ministry’s expenditure, with approximately 87% of its total budget allocated to it.  For 2020-21, the budget allocation for LPG subsidy has increased by 9.3% from the revised estimate for the same in 2019-20.   Further, the revised estimate for 2019-20 also marked a 3.3% increase from the budgeted estimates of 2019-20.  

The total amount allocated for subsidies in 2020-21 is Rs 40,915 crore which is a 6% increase from the revised estimates of 2019-20 and constitutes 95% of the total allocation to the ministry.

Figure 6: Trend of expenditure on subsidies

Sources:   Union Budget Documents; PRS.

The expenditure on subsidies can be divided in three major heads: (i) Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT-PAHAL scheme) for LPG and (ii) Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana (PMUY) scheme for LPG, and (iii) Kerosene subsidy.   

Table 2 highlights the expenditure for subsidies in the above three heads for 2018-19, revised estimate of expenditure for 2019-20 and the budgeted allocation for 2020-21.  

Table 2: Allocation for subsidy on LPG and Kerosene (in Rs Crore)

Major Head

Actual 18-19

Revised 19-20

Budgeted 20-21

% change (RE to BE)

DBT-PAHAL

16,478

29,628

35,605

20.2%

PMUY

3,200

3,724

1,118

-70.0%

Kerosene subsidy

4,569

4,483

3,659

-18.4%

Total

24,247

37,835

40,382

6.7%

Sources: Union Budget 2020-21; PRS.

Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana scheme

According to the National Sample Survey (2011-12), more than 67% of the rural households in the country used firewood as the primary source of energy for cooking. [4]  This is shown in Figure 7.  

Figure 7: Primary source of energy for cooking in rural areas (2011-12)

Sources: Energy Sources of Indian Households for Cooking and Lighting, 2011-12, NSS 68th Round; PRS.

The PMUY scheme was launched in May 2016 with the objective of providing LPG connections to women from below poverty line households with a support of Rs.1,600 per connection. [5]  The scheme aimed to target five crore households, which was later (February 2018) revised to target eight crore households by 2020. [6]  The ambit of the scheme was also expanded to cover all SC/ST households, beneficiaries of Pradhan Mantri Awas Yojana (Gramin), forest dwellers, backward classes, in addition to households identified under the Socio Economic and Caste Census (SECC).6

According to the Ministry, as of September 2019, a total of 8.03 crore PMUY connections were released across 715 districts in the country.  Of these, the maximum connections were released in Uttar Pradesh (1.48 crore), followed by West Bengal (89 lakh) and Bihar (86 lakh).  [7]  State-wise details on number of connections released under the scheme (as of September 2019 and December 2017) are provided in Table 6 in the Annexure. Nearly all states have seen a rapid increase in connections released under the scheme. 

The Comptroller and Auditor General (CAG) submitted a performance audit report on the PMUY scheme in December 2019.   In its Report, CAG found that as of March 31, 2019, 7.2 crore connections were released under the scheme. [8]  

Figure 8: Amount allocated for PMUY scheme and connections released under the scheme

Sources: CAG Performance Audit, December 2019; Union Budget Documents; PRS.

The CAG also raised concerns related to lack of sustained usage of cylinders released under the scheme.  As per Ministry data, till December 2018, there were nearly 5.9 crore beneficiaries under the scheme and the total number of refills under the scheme was nearly 28.8 crore. [9]  Figure 9 highlights the proportion of consumers who opted for refill under the scheme.  

75% of consumers opted for a refill under the scheme and 57% opted for 3 or more refills (from date of getting the connection till December 2018).   State-wise details (including UTs) on the proportion of consumers who opted for refill under the scheme are noted in Table 7 in the Annexure.  The refill proportion was highest in Delhi (97%), Haryana (94%), Uttarakhand (88%).   The proportion was lowest in Chhattisgarh (48%), Jharkhand (56%), Assam and Odisha (64%).      

Figure 9: Refill of cylinders under the PMUY scheme (in crore) (till December 31, 2018)

  

Sources:  Refill data, PMUY website, Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas; PRS.

The CAG performance audit report noted that the average annual refill rate for PMUY beneficiaries is low compared to the refill rate for non-PMUY beneficiaries (shown in Figure 10).8  The CAG recommended that since the target of releasing connections has broadly been achieved, the scheme should now be focused towards sustained usage of LPG cylinders. 

Figure 10: Average annual refill consumption for PMUY and non-PMUY consumers

Sources: CAG Performance Audit, December 2019; PRS.

The Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas (2019) also noted disparity in the average refill of domestic cylinders (6.3 cylinders during last year) and the average refill of LPG cylinders by PMUY beneficiaries (3.1 cylinders). [10]  It recommended a scheme to incentivise PMUY beneficiaries to increase refills of LPG cylinders.  Further, it recommended that the government should broaden the scope of the scheme to cover poor families residing in urban and semi-urban areas, with eventually aiming to provide LPG connections to all eligible households.10

An assessment report by the Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell (2016) pointed out the key barriers for not applying for LPG connection are: (i) high initial cost, including security deposit / price of gas stove and, (ii) high recurring cost of the cylinder. [11]  The Report also identified easy availability of firewood in the vicinity of forests as another primary barrier to adoption of LPG.  The top five states where over 40% of the households procure firewood for free are Gujarat, Madhya Pradesh, Jharkhand, Uttar Pradesh and Nagaland.

The CAG also highlighted issues related to implementation of the scheme.   It noted that there were various cases of: (i) discrepancies in identification of beneficiaries, (ii) delay in installation of connections, (iii) diversion of cylinders for commercial purposes, and (iv) non-compliance with safety standards.8   Further, the CAG noted that there are no parameters under the scheme to assess outcomes related to performance of the scheme (such as improvement in health of women and reduction in air pollution).  It recommended that the Ministry should develop a roadmap to assess these outcomes.  

Pratyaksha Hastaantarit Laabh (PAHAL) 

PAHAL Scheme was launched in 2014 (54 districts in first phase) and launched in rest of the country in 2015. [12]  Under the scheme, a consumer (with annual income up to Rs 10 lakh) can avail Direct Benefit Transfer (DBT) cash-subsidy for a LPG cylinder.  The beneficiaries buy LPG cylinders at market rate and subsequently receive subsidy directly in their bank accounts.  The average subsidy per cylinder on domestic LPG during the year 2016-17, 2017-18 and 2018-19 (up to 1st half) was Rs 108.8, Rs 173.4 and Rs 219.1, respectively. [13]  The effective cost of a domestic LPG cylinder (14.24 kg) after DBT subsidy, as of November 2019, was Rs 546.6. [14]     

As of September 2019, nearly 25.7 crore LPG consumers had joined the scheme (state wise details in Annexure). [15]  Figure 11 below shows cumulative cash transfer and beneficiaries under the scheme for 2014-15 to 2019-20.  

Figure 11: Cumulative cash transfer and number of beneficiaries under the scheme

Sources: Direct Benefit Transfer website, accessed on February 8, 2020; PRS.
 Note: Numbers for a year are cumulative transfers till that year.

The CAG (in 2019) noted that the coverage of LPG in the country has increased from 62% in May 2016 to 94.3% in March 2019.8  Table 3 details the coverage of LPG in the country.

Table 3: Coverage of LPG in the country

As on

Total connections (in crore)

Households (in crore)

Coverage (in %)

May-16

16.7

26.9

62.0%

Mar-17

19.7

27.3

72.8%

Mar-18

22.4

27.7

80.9%

Mar-19

26.5

28.2

94.3%

Sources: CAG Performance Audit, December 2019; PRS.

As per Direct Benefit Transfer web portal, the implementation of PAHAL scheme has resulted in an estimated savings of Rs 65,661 crore (up to December 2019). [16]  4.54 crore duplicate, fake, non-existent and inactive LPG connections have been eliminated under the scheme.  The 'GiveItUp' campaign was started by the Ministry with the aim to motivate consumers who can afford to pay the market price for LPG to voluntarily surrender their subsidy. [17]  1.03 crore consumers have opted out of the scheme under the 'GiveItUp' campaign (as of December 2018).13 

The CAG report on ‘Implementation of PAHAL Scheme’ (2016) noted that the scheme appears to have addressed the concern regarding diversion of subsidised LPG cylinders to commercial consumers. [18]  However, the risk of diversion of nonsubsidised domestic LPG to commercial consumers still remains as there is a significant difference in the cost of non-subsidised domestic LPG and commercial LPG.

There have also been complaints of supply of underweight cylinders and non-transfer of subsidy due to deseeding of Aadhaar from payments databases. [19],[20]  The consumer has now been given the option of receiving subsidy through bank account transfer without the use of Aadhaar. 

Kerosene Subsidy

Over the last few years, the Ministry’s expenditure on providing subsidy for kerosene has reduced from Rs 7,339 crore in 2015-16 to an estimated Rs 3,659 crore in 2020-21 (see Figure below).  

Figure 12: Kerosene subsidy (in Rs crore)

Sources: Union Budget Documents; PRS.
Note: Figures for 2019-20 are Revised Estimates and Figures for 2020-21 are Budget Estimates. 

Note that the government has stated that with the increase in LPG coverage and electrification in villages, the allocation for kerosene has been rationalised. [21]  The Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas (2017) had recommended that the Ministry should reduce the expenditure on this subsidy and work towards the eventual withdrawal of the subsidy. [22]  

The Committee noted that an increase in the coverage of LPG beneficiaries is necessary to reduce dependence on kerosene.22  This will result in the usage of cleaner fuel, promote the health of users, and address the problem of adulteration.  The Committee also recommended that states should be encouraged to move towards the direct cash transfer of kerosene subsidy to reduce inefficiencies in the delivery.  

Dependence on imports

India's import of crude oil has increased from 1,63,775 TMT (Thousand Metric Tons) in 2010-11 to 2,26,498 TMT in 2018-19.  Crude oil is refined in oil refineries to transform oil into useful petroleum products such as high speed diesel, LPG and kerosene.  These petroleum products are used as raw materials in various sectors and industries such as transport (fuel) and petrochemicals.   Further, they may also be used in factories to operate machinery or fuel generator sets.  In 2018-19, India's total export of petroleum products was 61,096 TMT.

Table 4 shows the total import of crude oil and petroleum products, consumption of petroleum products in the country and India's exports of petroleum products for the last 10 years. 

Table 4: Import, export and consumption of petroleum products in the country (in TMT)

Year

Crude Oil imports

Petroleum products import

Petroleum products export

Petroleum products consumption

 2010-11 

1,63,595

17,379

59,077

1,41,040

 2011-12 

1,71,729

15,849

60,837

1,48,132

 2012-13 

1,84,795

16,354

63,408

1,57,057

 2013-14 

1,89,238

16,697

67,864

1,58,407

 2014-15 

1,89,435

21,301

63,932

1,65,520

 2015-16 

2,02,850

29,456

60,539

1,84,674

 2016-17 

2,13,932

36,287

65,513

1,94,597

 2017-18 

2,20,433

35,461

66,833

2,06,166

 2018-19 

2,26,498

33,348

61,096

2,13,216

 2019-20 

1,68,589

31,619

50,055

1,60,603

Note: Data for 2019-20 is till December 2019.
 Sources: Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell; PRS.

Note that the India’s net import (total imports - exports) as a fraction of consumption has risen from 86.4% in 2010-11 to 93.5% in 2019-20.  Figure 13 shows the variation of net imports of petroleum products as a percentage of total consumption in the country. 

Figure 13: Net imports of Petroleum Products as percentage of total consumption (in TMT)

Sources:  Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell; PRS.

The Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas (2019) noted that the Middle East accounts for more than two-thirds of India’s crude oil imports, and urged the government to continue its crude oil import diversification efforts.10 

For Natural Gas, the total imports as a fraction of consumption has risen from 28% in 2011-12 to 47% in 2018-19.  Figure 14 shows the variation of net imports of Natural Gas as a percentage of total consumption of Natural Gas.

Figure 14: Imports of Natural Gas as percentage of total consumption

Sources:   Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell; PRS.
 Note:  MMSCM = Million Metric Standard Cubic Meters.

The Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas (2018) had noted that it does not find any concrete action taken by the ministry and a clear strategy with stipulated timelines to achieve the target of reduction in import dependence by 10% by 2022. [23]

Production and Exploration  

India’s Crude Oil and Condensate production has fallen from 38,082 TMT in 2011-12 to 34,203 TMT in 2018-19.  Similarly, the production of Natural Gas has fallen from 46,453 MMSCM (Million Metric Standard Cubic Meters) in 2011-12 to 32,058 MMSCM in 2018-19.  The Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas (2018) also noted that crude oil production has been stagnant for the last few years, which is a matter of serious concern.23

Figure 15: Crude Oil and Natural Gas production in India

Sources: Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell; PRS.

Oil and Natural Gas

The Cabinet approved a policy framework for reforms in the exploration and licensing policy for oil and gas fields in February 2019. [24]  The reforms aimed to enhance domestic exploration and production of oil and gas.  Previously, Cabinet had approved policy framework for exploration and exploitation of unconventional hydrocarbons such as shale oil and gas, and coal bed methane (CBM).  Note that CBM production in India has shown an upward trend. (Figures in Table 5). 

Table 5: Coal Bed Methane production

Year

Production (in MMSCM)

2015-16

1.07

2016-17

1.54

2017-18

2.23

2018-19 (P*)

4.93

2019-20 (P*)

6.24

2020-21 (P*)

7.29

Sources: Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas, Lok Sabha, Twenty-fifth Report, August 2018; PRS.

Note: P* = Provisional.

Mergers and disinvestment of Oil PSUs

The government has stated that it proposes to create an integrated public sector oil company to match the performance of international and domestic private sector oil and gas companies. [25] 

In January 2018, the government entered into an agreement with the Oil and Natural Gas Corporation (ONGC) for the sale of its 51% equity share-holding in Hindustan Petroleum Corporation Ltd (for Rs 36,915 crore). [26]  Through this acquisition, ONGC became the country's first vertically integrated 'oil major' company, with presence across entire value chain. 

Further, in November 2019, the Union Cabinet approved disinvestment of its 53.3% share in Bharat Petroleum Corporation Ltd along with transfer of management control to a strategic buyer. [27]  The Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas has held that mergers and acquisitions of PSUs will result in synergies and optimisation of logistics costs and refinery operations. [28]

The Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas (2017) noted that the creation of a 'oil major' will be helpful to strengthen balance sheet of PSUs. [29]  Further, it would lead to sharing of skills and research and development, and improve overall competitiveness of oil PSUs on global stage.  However, the Committee recommended  that the government needs to proceed with caution as there are several challenges such as integration of human resources and creating synergies in companies having diverse operations.   

 

Annexure

Table 6: Number of connections released under PMUY scheme

Sr. No.

State/UT

PMUY connections (as of December 2017)

PMUY connections (as of September 2019)

Total LPG consumers

1

Andaman & Nicobar Islands

1,697

13,103

1,07,101

2

Andhra Pradesh

79,743

3,90,998

1,34,65,372

3

Arunachal Pradesh

3,985

44,668

2,59,205

4

Assam

5,78,494

34,93,730

70,29,230

5

Bihar

44,81,284

85,71,668

1,73,25,775

6

Chandigarh

NA

88

2,75,875

7

Chhattisgarh

17,35,640

29,98,629

51,45,256

8

Dadra and Nagar Haveli

11,437

14,438

88,164

9

Daman and Diu

201

427

61,314

10

Delhi

519

77,051

48,61,826

11

Goa

978

1,082

4,87,619

12

Gujarat

12,32,009

29,07,682

1,03,71,353

13

Haryana

3,44,195

7,30,702

67,31,527

14

Himachal Pradesh

23,074

1,36,084

18,25,405

15

Jammu and Kashmir

3,57,855

12,03,246

31,54,279

16

Jharkhand

9,98,804

32,93,035

55,80,576

17

Karnataka

7,86,370

31,51,238

1,57,49,694

18

Kerala

28,676

2,56,303

86,92,507

19

Lakshadweep

108

292

7,981

20

Madhya Pradesh

30,16,371

71,79,224

1,48,30,583

21

Maharashtra

16,87,784

44,37,624

2,71,42,633

22

Manipur

20,415

1,56,195

5,39,943

23

Meghalaya

21,756

1,50,664

3,14,088

24

Mizoram

579

28,123

2,93,998

25

Nagaland

7,021

55,143

2,58,493

26

Odisha

18,59,230

47,50,478

85,09,322

27

Puducherry

2,116

13,566

3,70,292

28

Punjab

3,63,372

12,25,067

83,65,306

29

Rajasthan

24,48,313

63,92,482

1,60,92,755

30

Sikkim

545

8,747

1,40,838

31

Tamil Nadu

8,52,810

32,43,190

2,08,73,136

32

Telangana

41

10,75,202

1,07,35,477

33

Tripura

27,555

2,72,323

7,30,963

34

Uttar Pradesh

63,27,936

1,47,86,745

3,96,08,333

35

Uttarakhand

1,32,729

4,04,703

25,83,171

36

West Bengal

48,05,919

88,76,053

2,18,07,612

 

Total

3,22,39,561

8,03,39,993

27,44,17,002

Sources: State-wise PMUY connections released, Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, as accessed on February 10, 2020; Unstarred Question No. 1093, answered on December 27, 2017, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Rajya Sabha; Unstarred Question No. 182, answered on November 18, 2019, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Rajya Sabha; PRS.

Table 7: Number of consumers who opted for refill under the PMUY scheme (in Crore)

State/UT

Total connections till 2018

No. of consumers who came for refill

No. of consumers who have taken 3 or more refills

% of consumers who came for refill

% of consumers who came for 3 or more refill

Andaman and Nicobar

7,294

5,935

4,770

81.4%

65.4%

Andhra Pradesh

1,93,104

1,57,171

1,14,878

81.4%

59.5%

Arunachal Pradesh

36,818

29,155

21,875

79.2%

59.4%

Assam

23,68,650

15,15,196

10,19,589

64.0%

43.0%

Bihar

69,98,869

56,48,273

45,10,597

80.7%

64.4%

Chandigarh

46

33

28

71.7%

60.9%

Chhattisgarh

26,53,521

12,66,113

8,17,612

47.7%

30.8%

Dadra and Nagar Haveli

13,012

12,522

9,125

96.2%

70.1%

Daman and Diu

412

400

330

97.1%

80.1%

Delhi

63,894

61,698

58,568

96.6%

91.7%

Goa

1,052

1,019

949

96.9%

90.2%

Gujarat

19,07,333

16,05,729

13,44,138

84.2%

70.5%

Haryana

6,16,511

5,82,233

5,24,923

94.4%

85.1%

Himachal Pradesh

91,071

78,287

60,100

86.0%

66.0%

Jammu and Kashmir

8,46,553

6,03,958

3,92,480

71.3%

46.4%

Jharkhand

24,68,589

13,89,968

9,11,168

56.3%

36.9%

Karnataka

18,35,054

14,77,278

11,07,696

80.5%

60.4%

Kerala

1,56,533

1,32,512

96,271

84.7%

61.5%

Lakshadweep

287

243

196

84.7%

68.3%

Madhya Pradesh

52,98,247

35,65,379

24,98,803

67.3%

47.2%

Maharashtra

34,80,922

27,32,926

20,01,046

78.5%

57.5%

Manipur

1,03,903

90,939

77,413

87.5%

74.5%

Meghalaya

1,32,965

81,010

53,192

60.9%

40.0%

Mizoram

25,080

21,522

17,111

85.8%

68.2%

Nagaland

46,555

34,979

24,103

75.1%

51.8%

Odisha

35,51,904

22,82,374

16,33,126

64.3%

46.0%

Puducherry

12,814

11,786

9,949

92.0%

77.6%

Punjab

11,44,478

9,49,338

7,47,130

82.9%

65.3%

Rajasthan

44,08,608

36,00,336

28,05,270

81.7%

63.6%

Sikkim

5,442

4,458

3,393

81.9%

62.3%

Tamil Nadu

28,07,171

22,18,648

15,96,572

79.0%

56.9%

Telangana

5,22,787

3,67,634

2,01,789

70.3%

38.6%

Tripura

1,89,895

1,05,446

71,150

55.5%

37.5%

Uttar Pradesh

1,00,96,085

86,30,768

71,13,651

85.5%

70.5%

Uttarakhand

2,74,256

2,41,597

2,03,801

88.1%

74.3%

West Bengal

68,94,558

51,57,709

39,85,937

74.8%

57.8%

Total

5,92,54,273

4,46,64,572

3,40,38,729

75.4%

57.4%

Sources: Refill data, PMUY website, Ministry of Petroleum & Natural Gas, accessed on February 6, 2020; PRS. 

Table 8: Number of consumers who have joined the PAHAL scheme

Sr. No.

State/UT

PAHAL scheme consumers
 (as on September 20, 2019)

1

Andaman and Nicobar Islands

 87,115 

2

Andhra Pradesh

                            1,27,51,343 

3

Arunachal Pradesh

2,00,666

4

Assam

68,46,061

5

Bihar

1,66,81,327

6

Chandigarh

2,48,310

7

Chhattisgarh

49,22,045

8

Dadra and Nagar Haveli

81,859

9

Daman and Diu

57,618

10

Delhi

41,08,419

11

Goa

4,18,565

12

Gujarat

94,86,981

13

Haryana

62,14,026

14

Himachal Pradesh

15,92,392

15

Jammu and Kashmir

29,81,157

16

Jharkhand

53,13,783

17

Karnataka

1,44,91,085

18

Kerala

81,00,093

19

Lakshadweep

7,000

20

Madhya Pradesh

1,41,89,879

21

Maharashtra

2,45,85,778

22

Manipur

5,11,234

23

Meghalaya

3,01,176

24

Mizoram

2,33,001

25

Nagaland

1,82,130

26

Odisha

81,53,094

27

Puducherry

3,50,098

28

Punjab

77,56,468

29

Rajasthan

1,51,52,931

30

Sikkim

1,28,853

31

Tamil Nadu

1,94,85,501

32

Telangana

1,00,06,967

33

Tripura

7,16,146

34

Uttar Pradesh

3,74,25,995

35

Uttarakhand

23,33,244

36

West Bengal

2,08,75,314

 

Total

25,69,77,654

Sources: "Pahal Scheme", Unstarred Question No. 2016, answered on December 6, 2019, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas,
 Lok Sabha; PRS.

[1] About the Scheme, PAHAL – Direct Benefits Transfer for LPG, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas,  http://petroleum.nic.in/dbt/whatisdbtl.html.  

[2] Brief Report on Jagdishpur- Haldia & Bokaro- Dhamra Pipeline (JHBDPL Phase-II) Project, Environment Clearance,  http://environmentclearance.nic.in/writereaddata/Online/TOR/11_Jan_2017_125110330F858KUXWProjectSummaryJHBDPLPhaseII.pdf.

[3] Annual Report 2016-17, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas,  http://petroleum.nic.in/sites/default/files/AR16-17.pdf.  

[4] Energy Sources of Indian Households for Cooking and Lighting, 2011-12, NSS 68th Round, July 2011-June 2012, Ministry of Statistics and Programme Implementation,  http://mospi.nic.in/sites/default/files/publication_reports/nss_report_567.pdf.  

[5] About PMUY, Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas,  https://www.pmujjwalayojana.com.

[6] ‘Cabinet approves enhancement of target under Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana’, Press Information Bureau, Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs, February 7, 2018.

[7] State-wise PMUY connections released, Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, as accessed on February 10, 2020,  https://pmuy.gov.in/released-connections.html.

[8] Report of the Comptroller and Auditor General of India on Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana, Performance Audit, No. 14 of 2019, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, December 11, 2019,  https://cag.gov.in/sites/default/files/audit_report_files/Report_No_14_of_2019_Performance_Audit_of_Pradhan_Mantri_Ujjwala_Yojana_Ministry_of_Petroleum_and_Natural_Gas_0.pdf.

[9] Refill Data, Pradhan Mantri Ujjwala Yojana, accessed on February 6, 2020,  https://pmuy.gov.in/registereduser.html.

[10]1st Report of the Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas on the Demands for Grants of the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (2019-20), December 2019,
  http://164.100.47.193/lsscommittee/Petroleum%20&%20Natural%20Gas/17_Petroleum_And_Natural_Gas_1.pdf

[11] Assessment report: Primary survey on

household cooking fuel usage and willingness to convert to LPG, Petroleum Planning & Analysis Cell, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, June 2016,  http://ppac.org.in/WriteReadData/Reports/201710310449342512219PrimarySurveyReportPPAC.pdf.

[12] PAHAL-Direct Benefits Transfer for LPG(DBTL) Consumers Scheme, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas,  http://petroleum.nic.in/dbt/whatisdbtl.html.

[13] ‘1.03 crore LPG Consumers have voluntarily Surrendered LPG Subsidy’, Press Information Bureau, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, December 17, 2018.

[14] Oil Industry Information at a Glance, Petroleum Planning and Analysis Cell, November 2019,  https://www.ppac.gov.in/WriteReadData/Reports/201912060336500305462ReadyReckonerNov2019WebVersion.pdf.

[15] "Pahal Scheme", Unstarred Question No. 2016, answered on December 6, 2019, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Lok Sabha,  http://164.100.24.220/loksabhaquestions/annex/172/AU2106.pdf.

[16] Estimated Gains, Direct Benefit Transfer, as accesed on February 8, 2020,  https://dbtbharat.gov.in/estimatedgain

[17] 'GiveItUp', About the GiveItUp campaign, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas,  http://www.givitup.in/about.html.

[18] CAG Report on Implementation of PAHAL (DBTL) Scheme, Report No. 25 of 2016, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas,  https://cag.gov.in/sites/default/files/audit_report_files/Union_Commercial_Compliance_Full_Report_25_2016_English.pdf.

[19] ‘DBTL under Implementation in 715 Districts’, Press Information Bureau, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, December 31, 2018. 

[20] ‘23.24 Crore Consumers joined Direct Benefit Transfer of LPG subsidies’, Press Information Bureau, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, January 2, 2019. 

[21] Unstarred Question No. 2295, Lok Sabha, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Answered on January 1, 2018,  http://164.100.47.190/loksabhaquestions/annex/13/AU2295.pdf.

[22] 18th Report of the Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas on the Demands for Grants of the Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas (2017-18), March 2017,  http://164.100.47.193/lsscommittee/Petroleum%20&%20Natural%20Gas/16_Petroleum_And_Natural_Gas_18.pdf.

[23] Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas, Lok Sabha, Twenty-fifth Report, August 2018,  http://164.100.47.193/lsscommittee/Petroleum%20&%20Natural%20Gas/16_Petroleum_And_Natural_Gas_25.pdf.

[24] “Exploration and Licensing Policy for Enhancing Domestic Exploration and Production of Oil and Gas”, Press Information Bureau, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, February 21, 2019. 

[26] "The Government of India enters into an agreement with ONGC today for the Strategic Sale of its 51.11% equity share-holding in HPCL at a consideration of Rs. 36,915 crore", Press Information Bureau, Ministry of Finance, January 20, 2018. 

[27] "Cabinet approves strategic disinvestment of CPSE", Press Information Bureau, Cabinet Committee on Economic Affairs, November 20, 2019. 

[28] "Acquisition of State PSUs", Unstarred Question No. 871, Ministry of Petroleum and Natural Gas, Lok Sabha,  http://164.100.24.220/loksabhaquestions/annex/15/AU871.pdf.

[29] Standing Committee on Petroleum and Natural Gas, Lok Sabha, Eighteenth Report, March 2017,  http://164.100.47.193/lsscommittee/Petroleum%20&%20Natural%20Gas/16_Petroleum_And_Natural_Gas_18.pdf

 

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